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Epidural Steroid Injections

Overview

This injection treats the pain of an inflamed nerve in your cervical spine. It relieves nerve swelling. If you have a herniated disc, spinal stenosis or some other problem that's pressing on a nerve, it may help you.

Placing the Needle

Next, a needle is inserted through this numbed tissue. The doctor uses a fluoroscope (a video x-ray device) to guide the needle into the epidural space. That's the space around your inflamed nerve. The doctor may inject contrast dye to make sure the needle is in the right place.

Injection

Finally, the doctor injects the medicine. It bathes the painful nerve. It relieves pain and swelling. If you have other painful nerves, you may need more than one injection.

End of Procedure and Aftercare

After your injection, you'll be watched for a short time, then you can go home. To get the full benefit, you may need to come back for more injections. Your doctor will create a plan that's right for you.

Preparation

To begin, you lie down. You may be given medicine to help you relax. You are numbed with an injection of local anesthetic.

Overview

This outpatient procedure is an injection performed to relieve pain in the upper back.

Placing the Needle

The physician uses an x-ray device called a fluoroscope to guide a needle down to the vertebra that is causing the pain. The needle is carefully pushed into the epidural space, which is the area surrounding the spinal cord. A contrast solution is injected to confirm the needle's position.

Injection

The physician injects a steroid-anesthetic mix into the epidural space, bathing the painful areas with soothing medication. The mixture will help reduce inflammation and reduce pain.

End of Procedure and Aftercare

The needle is removed, and the injection site may be covered with a small bandage. Extended pain relief usually begins within three to five days of the injection. In some cases it may be necessary to repeat the procedure as many as three times to get the full benefit of the medication. However, many patients get significant relief from only one or two injections.

Preparation

The patient sits or lies down to expose the back. The back is cleaned and sterilized, and a local anesthetic is administered to numb the tissue of the injection site down to the spinal column.

Overview

This injection procedure is performed to relieve low back and radiating leg pain. Steroid medication can reduce the swelling and inflammation caused by spinal conditions.

Placing the Needle

Using a fluoroscope for guidance, the physician slides the needle toward the epidural space between the L-4 and L-5 vertebra. A contrast solution is injected. The physician uses the fluoroscope to confirm the correct location of the needle tip.

Injection

A steroid-anesthetics mix is injected into the epidural space, bathing the painful nerve root with soothing medication.

End of Procedure and Aftercare

The needle is removed, and a small bandage is applied to cover the tiny needle surface wound. In some cases it may be necessary to repeat the procedure as many as three times to get the full benefit of the medication. Many patients get significant relief from only one or two injections.

Preparation

The patient lies face down. A cushion under the stomach area provides comfort and flexes the back. In this position, the spine opens and allows for easier access to the epidural space. A local anesthetic is used to numb the skin. All the tissue down to the surface of the lamina portion of the lumbar vertebra bone is anesthetized. The physician slides a thicker needle through the anesthetized track.

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